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Participate in Research


As confirmed by our Masters student research intern Emily Giroux in the video above, your personal experience and insights can help change the world. Whether it’s a quick online survey or a few days in a clinical setting, participating in research advances the science of SCI and helps those living with SCI in any number of important ways.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS

Participating in ethical research studies can be a rewarding experience, not to mention super helpful for moving science forward! Check below for Current Opportunities. Spinal Cord Injury Ontario may not be affiliated with the researcher or the research project and provides this information as a resource to those who may be interested in participating. To learn more about a particular study please contact the person identified with each project.

We encourage you to do your own research before agreeing to participate in any study.

CURRENT OPPORTUNITIES TO PARTICIPATE IN RESEARCH

1. How do people living with a spinal cord injury select a bladder management method? 

This project will determine how people living with a SCI value different psychosocial aspects that are related to bladder management.

If you have a spinal cord injury you may be eligible to participate in a research study.

Who is eligible?

  • You must have a Spinal Cord Injury for 1 year or longer
  • You must be 18 years of age and older
  • You must be willing to communicate with research staff using either email or telephone.

This study includes the following:

  • One short telephone call to gather some basic information (10-15min) followed by an online survey (30-45min) done at your convenience.
  • A $50 honorarium is provided at the end of the study in recognition of your time.

For more information and to see if you qualify, please contact
Dr. Blayne Welk’s Research Nurse (Mary) at mary.mckibbon@sjhc.london.on.ca or go to https://www.nbrg.org/research/selecting-a-bladder-management-method/participate.php

 


2. Understanding how muscles respond to Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy

Functional electrical stimulation therapy (FES-T) has been shown to help restore reaching and grasping function after spinal cord injury (SCI). This study is examining factors that may predict how well a muscle will respond to FES-T. This information is needed to personalize treatments and ensure the best use of time in therapy. We are recruiting individuals with cervical SCI, at least 6 months post-injury, who are planning to start FES-T for reaching and grasping. The study will involve one measurement session before the start of therapy, and a 5 minute muscle testing procedure at every therapy session. While this study does not itself provide the therapy, individuals interested in potentially receiving FES-T can contact the Rocket Family Upper Extremity Clinic at UHN: https://www.uhn.ca/TorontoRehab/Clinics/Rocket_Family_Upper_Extremity

Who can participate? 

We are recruiting individuals with cervical SCI, at least 6 months post‐injury, who are planning to start FES‐T for reaching and grasping. While this study does not itself provide the therapy, individuals interested in potentially receiving FES‐T can contact the Rocket Family Upper Extremity Clinic at the University Health Network: https://www.kite‐uhn.com/service/rocketclinic

What does the study involve?

  • 1 visit before you start FES‐T, in which we will measure the electrical activity of a few upper limb muscles.
  • A short procedure (less than 5 minutes) at the beginning of every FES‐T session, in which the therapist will manually measure the strength of the muscles receiving treatment, in order to track their recovery over time.
  • Participants will receive compensation for the study visit.

How to get involved?

This study is being conducted at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute – University Health Network in Toronto. For further information, please contact Sharmini Atputharaj at Sharmini.Atputharaj@uhn.ca or 416‐597‐3422 ext. 6119.

 

 

 

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